Review: Faery Reel

Book: Faery Reel

Author: Arielle Pierce

Genre: Paranormal Gay Romance

Publisher: Self-published (Part of the “Don’t Read in the Closet” event from the mmromance group on Goodreads.com)

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

 

This story felt authentic, which makes sense when I read that Arielle has lived in Wales. I really liked the main character’s voice, which was a combination of snark and dispirited hopefulness, especially when it comes to his love life. Osian encounters a member of the Sidhe (Fae) while visiting Ireland and badmouthing their folk music. While Conall might succeed at physically seducing Osian, it takes quite a bit more before he’s willing to let his heart open up.

This was a novella and it ran through the story in a fairly quick and straightforward way, but the voice and the attention to detail is why I give this story four stars. Plus I like that the Fae were slightly dangerous and that there was a feeling of danger in whether or not to succumb to their charms.

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Review: The Last Yeti

Book: The Last Yeti

Author: Tully Vincent

Publisher: Goodreads MMRomance group (as part of the 2015 “Don’t Read in the Closet” event)

Genre: Paranormal mmromance

Rating: 4.0 out of 5 stars

Tully’s a newcomer to writing mmromance, and I know her, but anyone who knows me is aware that when I review, I don’t go easy on someone just because I know them or chat with them online.

That being said, I really enjoyed this book. Tully did a fabulous job setting up the mythos of the yeti–and I never saw myself reading, much less enjoying a book about a yeti to begin with! Jrake was a very well done character with all the tragedy and loneliness of being the last of his kind. I like that the human character, Rohn, has a disability in the form of an amputated arm. Both the characters had anger at the world for their predicaments. I do love messed up characters.

The sex was hot, and I liked the development of the relationship between the two. I also liked Tully’s use of the setting in Alaska, and how it shapes both men. This isn’t a long novel, but the story felt complete to me. I understand she’s working on more between these two, which should be interesting.

Review: Juggernaut by Amelia Gormley

Title: Juggernaut

Series: A Strain Novel

Author: Amelia Gormley

Publisher: Riptide Publishing

Genre: M/M Dystopian

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

 

It’s been a while since I posted my last review. My reading has really slowed down this year, as I’ve been focusing on writing and editing things, getting ready for publishing. The first Strain novel I gave a 5 star rating, because I thought it was an incredible book. The universe that Amelia created was horrifying and yet fascinating, as was the dynamic she created between the main characters, struggling to survive in a post-apocalyptic world of zombie-like humans infected with what is affectionately known as the Rot.

I enjoyed Juggernaut, but not as much. This novel takes place before the¬†three viruses basically wipe out humanity, showcasing a rather corrupt and decadent society of institutionalized prostitution and religious zealots. There were strong parts of the story, including a traumatic experience Nico has with one of his clients and the interactions between himself and General McClosky who is one of the people responsible for the Alpha virus, the virus that started it all. The book takes the reader through the entire epidemic, showing the devastation and humanity’s efforts to save itself through a compound in Colorado.

It was there that the novel started to lose steam. There was a lot of time apart for the characters, dealing with politics in two different societies: the Juggernauts, and the human refugee camp. I think it was this separation that made the book not quite as compelling as the first Strain novel. It was still a good book (be aware that this is a two parter, so their story is not completed by the end). It just wasn’t as much as I had expected. The novel had a lot of time spent with the world setup at the beginning, and a reorganization of society at the end. I would consider this more of a sci-fi novel than a romance. This isn’t a bad thing. It’s just a matter of what readers should expect.

I’m still looking forward to the conclusion of Nico and Zach’s story in Bane.

 

Review: Chasing Death Metal Dreams

Book: Chasing Death Metal Dreams

Author: Kaje Harper

Publisher: MMRomance Group on Goodreads.com

Genre: LGBT Romance (Trans, FTM/M)

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

(This book was written as part of the MMRomance Group on Goodread’s “Don’t Read in the Closet” event, 2015.¬† It’s offered for free and was based on a written prompt.)

I’ve read other work by Kaje Harper before (Life Lessons 1), but this was the first time I’ve read a romance between a gay biological man and a transgender man. I have friends in the LGBT community who are trans, and I’ve heard some stories about how they transitioned, so I found this a fascinating topic to discuss in a romance.

I think the Kaje nailed it–the death metal culture, the mixture of Latino and Mexican culture, and the experience of being a transitioned FTM (female to male). Kaje didn’t even shy back from the full description of sex, in all it’s awkwardness…and glory. This is a romance that stretches the reader’s understanding of what it means to be gay, and to be male.

I recommend this for readers of gay romance, LGBT romance in general, and particularly to those who love rock band romance.

Review: In Distress

Title: In Distress

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Author: Caethes Faron

Publisher: Branwen Press

Genre: M/M Science Fiction

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

This was enjoyable–there just isn’t enough M/M science fiction out there, and as a big fan of science fiction, I protest. The plot was a bit simple, which was why it was 3.5 and not 4 stars. In a society where some past event has supposedly (we’re never really sure if it’s true) mutated the human genome, children are categorized as either Alphas, which are true humans, Betas, and Zeds, which are considered sub-human and are enslaved, having no rights whatsoever. Add in scary collars that will kill you if you stray, and evil Geneticists, and you’ve got a good party going. I liked the addition of a BDSM element as well. Actually, the BDSM element was one of the best parts of the book. I would have liked a bit more tension and action, but it was interesting having an “alpha” male be in fact a submissive masochist.

I wish I had more to say about this book–I hesitated even posting a review on it, but I thought the premise was interesting enough that it deserved a mention. The relationship parts were interesting. I just think there was dead time that lessened the impact of the novel. I’d love to see these two again, however, embroiled in a full out rebellion against the dystopian society.

New Review by “The Novel Approach”!

Well this was a nice surprise! I received a new review for the M/M short story “The New Hire” (Part two of the Hard Hat series) today from The Novel Approach! Check it out.

Other than that, I’m being quiet this week, focusing on writing as I wait for word on my resubmission. I’ll probably put up a progress report next week. Maybe I’ll put up a scene or two from my weretiger WIP that I hope to have ready for publication in December.

Lol, I also have plenty of DRitC books to read to keep me busy. And my own, “Vice and Exploitation,” is still #1 in Multiple Partners on AllRomanceEbooks.com, and #19 in free Gay Fiction on Amazon. Thanks for all the lovely reviews!